FAQs about massageFrequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Do I have to undress completely?
No. You may undress to whatever degree you feel comfortable.
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What if my body does something embarrassing?
Your body may occasionally do things that embarrass you (passing gas, being ticklish, etc.). Rest assured that the normal
operations of the body are understood and accepted in this setting.
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Will it hurt?
I do not believe in the “no pain, no gain” approach. If at any point during your massage,
you are ever uncomfortable with any aspect of your massage, please communicate
your needs so I can adjust accordingly.
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What if I need to go to the bathroom?
Massage moves fluid through the body so I always suggest using the restroom prior
to your session. However, should you need a bathroom break, just let me know.
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Do I need to talk?
Some people like to talk, while others remain silent. Talking can be a way of unburdening
or opening up. Being silent can be a way of concentrating or letting go. It’s your choice.
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What’s the tipping protocol?
Tipping is neither expected nor inappropriate. Just paying the session fee is fully adequate.
If someone does make such a gift, I appreciate their generosity but I do not expect them
to do so again in the future.
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Should I have my doctor’s permission?
There are contraindications – meaning you are not able to receive massage, or the massage
may be limited to certain areas of your body. Not all contraindications mean that you will
never be able to have a massage – it just may not be appropriate at the present time.

Some common local contraindications (avoiding affected areas) abnormal lumps, athlete’s
foot, blisters, bruises, cystitis, gouty arthritis, hernias, local inflammation, open wounds,
poison ivy – oak – sumac, shingles, ulcers, burns, varicose veins and warts.

Absolute contraindications are conditions where you cannot receive a massage.
They may not be permanent; meaning that you may have a condition that, once it clears,
you can receive a massage. Some common temporary, absolute contraindications for
massage: chicken pox, fever, diarrhea (if due to infection), gout (during acute phase),
hepatitis, hives, pneumonia, ringworm, recent injuries or surgeries, lupus (during a flare up).
Some permanent contraindications that will prevent you from receiving massage include
blood clots, cirrhosis of the liver, deep vein thrombosis (DVT), embolism, uncontrolled
hypertension, intestinal obstruction, kidney failure, myocarditis, pericarditis, pulmonary
embolism, severe osteoporosis, or tuberculosis.

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Massage has many benefits, but certain conditions warrant caution.
If you have a condition that has not been listed here, or if you are
unclear about whether you can receive your massage, talk to your doctor.
I am available at no charge to consult with your doctor to make sure
massage is right for you.